Using binaural and spherical microphone arrays to assess the quality of synthetic spatial sound fields

Recently, we completed the Collaborative-Research Augmented Immersive Virtual Environment Laboratory (CRAIVE-Lab) with a usable floor area of 12 × 10 m2 at Rensselaer. The CRAIVE-Lab project addresses the need for a specialized virtual-reality (VR) system for the study and enabling of communication-driven tasks with groups of users immersed in a high-fidelity multi-modal environment located in the same physical space. For the acoustic domain, a 134-loudspeaker-channel system has been installed for Wave Field Synthesis (WFS) with the support of Higher-Order-Ambisonic (HoA) sound projection to render inhomogeneous acoustic fields. An integrated 16-channel spherical microphone array makes the CRAIVE-Lab an ideal test bed to study different spatial rendering techniques such as Wave-Field Synthesis, Higher-Order Ambisonics and Virtual Microphone Control (ViMiC). In this talk, sound-field measurements taken with a traditional binaural manikin will be compared to spherical microphone recordings to assess the quality of the different rendering techniques for large-scale labs. A focus will hereby be set on assessing the sweet spot area for different rendering techniques. [Work supported by NSF 1229391, NSF 1631674, and the Cognitive and Immersive Systems Laboratory (CISL).]

Reference

Jonas Braasch, Nikhil Deshpande, Jonathan Mathews, and Samuel Chabot, "Using binaural and spherical microphone arrays to assess the quality of synthetic spatial sound fields,"

The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 141, 3465 (2017)

Bibtex

@article{braasch2017using,
  title={Using binaural and spherical microphone arrays to assess the quality of synthetic spatial sound fields},
  author={Braasch, Jonas and Deshpande, Nikhil and Mathews, Jonathan and Chabot, Samuel},
  journal={The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America},
  volume={141},
  number={5},
  pages={3465--3465},
  year={2017},
  publisher={ASA}
}